Teaching

In Spring 2017, I'm teaching CS590P Secure Distributed Systems. This is a class devoted to the study of securing distributed systems, with decentralized digital currencies serving as our real platform of interest. Examples of such decentralized systems include Bitcoin and Ethereum, which are both open source, the subject of great academic interest (hundreds of papers), and supporting an enormous user base (not to mention holding hundreds of millions of dollars in value). We'll start with the fundamentals of Lamport's, Fischer's, and Douceur's results that fence-in consensus systems, including blockchains. We'll also look at the efficiency of the network architectures for peer-to-peer communication and attacks on their security (e.g., eclipse and other denial of service attacks). And we'll review applied crypto such as elliptical curves (used to validate transactions). Other topics include privacy and attribution, economics and finance, and crime. I last taught this class in Spring 2016 (where it was numbered 591SP).

Also in Spring 2017, I'm helping out a few other instructors to ensure we expand our security offerings. Joshua Pikovsky will run a new 1-credit 197S Basics of Security class for on-campus frosh and sophomores. And Parviz Kermani will be teaching a revised CICS 591C Introduction to Computer Security available through CPE as an online offering.

In Fall 2016, I ran CS591CF Security Lecture Series with with Amir, Dan, and Wayne; we ran the same course in Fall 2015 as the Cyber Security Faculty Lecture Series .

In Fall 2015, I taught cs391LI: Computer Crime Law, a study of the legal issues related to crimes involving computers and networks. We also studied the technologies of forensic investigation, intelligence gathering, privacy enhancement, and censorship resistance. Our main legal topics included recent and important case law, statutes, and constitutional clauses concerning authorization, access, search and seizure, wiretaps, the right to privacy, and FISA. Our technology topics included methods of investigation and resistance in the context of the Internet and cellular networks. Students are assumed to have no background in legal concepts.

Courses I have created:
  • CS391LI: Computer Crime Law (Fall 2015; Fall 2014; Fall 2011 co-taught with Marc Liberatore; and Fall 2010 as a seminar).
  • CS 365: Digital Forensics (Spring 2015, Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2008, Fall 2007) Started out as cs491c.
  • CS491cc: Advanced Digital Forensics (Spring 2008)
  • CS660: Advanced Information Assurance (co-taught with Kevin Fu in Fall 2006; Spring 2005). This course began life as 691CC.
  • 491Q/691Q: System Building for Mobile Devices (with Prashant Shenoy in Spring 2003; Spring 2004, Fall 2004)
  • CS460: Introduction to Computer and Network Security (with Jake Cunningham and Chris Misra in Spring 2001 and Spring 2002; with Chris Misra in Spring 2003, Spring 2004, and Fall 2004; this class is still offered but was led and taught by Chris Misra for years, and now by Prof. Amir Houmansadr; Started as 491s/415.
  • 653 Advanced Computer Networks (Fall 2000 and Fall 2001; this course was offered previously, but only as extra assignments from the undergrad class and text. I completely revamped the curriculum to focus on research papers only.)
Other courses I have taught:
  • 453: Computer Networks (Spring 2000)
  • CS187 Programming with Data Structures (Spring 2012)
Seminars I have offered:
  • CS691BL: CS691BL: Introduction to the R Programming Language
  • CS691un: Underwater Networking and Sensing Seminar (with Jim Kurose and Prashant Shenoy; and partners from WHOI, UMass Lowell, and UMass Dartmouth in Spring 2008)
  • CS491P and CS491O: Outdoor Mobile Network Environment. (with Mark Corner in Fall 2006 and Spring 2007) Really a massive set of undergraduate independent studies
  • CS191S: Talent Advancement Program Seminar (with Kevin Fu in Fall 2006)
  • CS591R: Five College Information Assurance Lecture Series (with Mark Corner in Fall 2004)
  • 791N: Seminar: Peer-to-Peer Networking (Fall 2001 with Jim Kurose and Don Towsley).
  • 691M: Seminar: Multicast (Fall 1999 -- my first course at UMass!)