Posts

Nominated for a Distinguished Teaching Award

I have been nominated for a 2016–2017 Distinguished Teaching Award (DTA).

COMPSCI 190D (Using Data Structures) and 365/590F (Digital Forensics)

Next semester (Spring 2017) I am teaching two courses: COMPSCI 190D: Using Data Structures and COMPSCI 365/590F: Digital Forensics.

COMPSCI 190D: Using Data Structures

Next semester (Fall 2016) I am teaching COMPSCI 190D: Using Data Structures.

COMPSCI 391L/591L: Computer Crime Law

Next semester (Fall 2016) I am teaching COMPSCI 391L/591L: Computer Crime Law.

Joining the CICS Faculty

I will be joining the CICS faculty as a lecturer in Fall 2016.

Joined the PETS 2017 TPC

I’ve joined the PETS 2017 TPC. The Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium is the premier venue for novel research on the theoretical and practical aspects of privacy technologies. Please submit your work! As of 2015, PETS has moved to an open-access journal/conference hybrid model. Articles are submitted for review to an issue of the PoPETs open-access journal, and accepted articles are made freely available online by De Gruyter: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/popets. Since this change, we have seen an increase in the number and diversity of submissions.

CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service at UMass

UMass has been awarded an NSF CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service grant (DGE-1565521). In short, undergraduate or graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and studying cybersecurity are eligible for tuition and fee waivers and generous stipends.

To apply, visit the UMass SFS page.

More information is available in the official press release.

Nominated for a Distinguished Teaching Award

I have been nominated for a 2015-2016 Distinguished Teaching Award (DTA), a campus-wide student-driven recognition of teaching, for my teaching of CMPSCI 187 last semester.

(DTA selection evaluations are only conducted when nominees teach during a Fall semester. I am not teaching this semester, so I must defer my nomination.)

COMPSCI 290NW: A Networked World

Next semester (Spring 2016) I am tentatively scheduled to be the instructor for COMPSCI 290NW: A Networked World. Last offered in Fall 2014, COMPSCI 290NW is not intended for CS majors, but it is an excellent introduction to networking, the Internet, and related technologies for non-majors. It is of particular interest to students pursuing the IT minor and for (BDIC) Informatics majors. The College of Information and Computer Sciences handles course wait lists centrally.

Discovering Specification Violations in Networked Software Systems

Discovering Specification Violations in Networked Software Systems, written in collaboration with Robert Walls, Yuriy Brun, and Brian Levine, has been accepted to the IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering. From the abstract: Publicly released software implementations of network protocols often have bugs that arise from latent specification violations. We present APE, a technique that explores program behavior to identify potential specification violations. APE overcomes the challenge of exploring the large space of behavior by dynamically inferring precise models of behavior, stimulating unobserved behavior likely to lead to violations, and refining the behavioral models with the new, stimulated behavior.